Cruise Forward

Wellbeing

No vacation comes close to cruising as a safe and reliable way to travel. The cruise industry is fully involved in continuous development of best practices when it comes to the safety, security and health of everyone on board a ship  - guests and crewmembers alike.

THE FACTS

  • Cruise ships are regularly sanitized,
    from door handles to poker chips

  • The simple act of hand washing –
    whether on land or on a ship –
    has been proven to prevent most viruses

  • Every oceangoing cruise ship must have
    a certified physician on board

  • You are 750 times less likely to get norovirus
    on a cruise ship than on land

Health

Cruise lines continuously focus on providing clean and sanitary environments aboard their ships for the health of all on board. Should the need arise, cruise lines are equipped with medical facilities for guests and crew members. All of CLIA’s oceangoing members must adhere to “Health Care Guidelines for Cruise Ship Medical Facilities” established by the American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP), the largest association of emergency medical professionals in the world.

FAQs

Q. Are cruise ships a likely place to get sick?

A. Hardly ever.

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Doctors. Nurses. And other medical staff.

Doctors. Nurses. And other medical staff.

Doctors are standing by. 24/7

Shipboard medical staffing is a function of a vessel’s size, passenger, and crew capacity. Smaller vessels have at least one licensed physician and one registered nurse, but it is common for larger vessels to have two or three licensed physicians and up to five registered nurses per vessel. In every case, the medical staff is available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. In line with guidelines from the American College of Emergency Physicians, cruise line physicians must be able to perform advanced life support practices, emergency cardiovascular care and minor surgical procedures.

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Norovirus: Think restaurants, not cruise ships, CDC says.

Norovirus: Think restaurants, not cruise ships, CDC says.

The nasty germ known as norovirus gets its bad rap from high-profile cruise ship outbreaks, like the Explorer of the Seas debacle that sickened nearly 700 people in January.

In reality, a new government analysis shows that you're more likely to get sick from the highly contagious gut bug in a far less exotic locale: at a local restaurant, spread by the (unwashed) hands of a food service worker. 

More about norovirus

INFOGRAPHIC

To us, prevention is priceless.

QUOTE

Health by the CDC’s numbers.

“In 2013, 10.1 million people embarked on a cruise from a U.S. port.
There were four norovirus outbreaks involving about 834 passengers in all. That amounts to approximately 1 in 12,000 passengers, compared with 1 in 15 people who contract norovirus on land every year. 

“...Sensationalized news reports about norovirus outbreaks on cruise ships simply do not line up with the facts. The latest CDC report provides strong evidence that cruise lines are going to great lengths to protect the health of passengers -- and are succeeding.“

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If you fall ill, don’t worry.

If you fall ill, don’t worry.

Because cruise ships are essentially floating cities, major lines contain infirmaries with staff available 24 hours a day to care for passengers. These facilities are typically equipped to treat only minor nonemergency conditions. You can get seasickness tablets for free, for example, or standard over-the-counter meds for an upset stomach or cold symptoms, for a fee. 

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Above and beyond.

Above and beyond.

We take passenger health seriously.

Cruise lines operating to or from U.S. ports must meet or exceed both U.S. and international laws to protect the health of all on board.

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CDC report debunks myth about norovirus on cruise ships.

CDC report debunks myth about norovirus on cruise ships.

The recent release of a report on norovirus from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), underscores what the cruise industry has known and communicated for a long time:  The occurrence of norovirus on cruise ships is rare and it is dramatically lower than the number of incidents on land.

More about norovirus

DOWNLOADABLE RESOURCES

Get the facts on norovirus.

Get the facts on norovirus.

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Debunking the myths about norovirus.

Debunking the myths about norovirus.

Dr. Joyce Johnson, DO, Rear Admiral, U.S. Public Health Service (ret.) dispels the notion that norovirus is a cruise ship disease:

“While outbreaks of norovirus on cruise ships pale in comparison to those on land, the cruise industry’s trade group says the industry voluntarily works with the CDC out of an abundance of care for passengers and to strive for a goal of zero outbreaks… good hygiene, the efforts of the ship’s crew, and simple math make it a pretty safe bet you’ll stay healthy even if there is an “outbreak.”

Read the full article.

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The Myth of the Cruise Ship Disease

The Myth of the Cruise Ship Disease

Dr. Joyce Johnson, DO, Rear Admiral, U.S. Public Health Service (ret.) dispels the notion that norovirus is a cruise ship disease:

“While outbreaks of norovirus on cruise ships pale in comparison to those on land, the cruise industry’s trade group says the industry voluntarily works with the CDC out of an abundance of care for passengers and to strive for a goal of zero outbreaks… good hygiene, the efforts of the ship’s crew, and simple math make it a pretty safe bet you’ll stay healthy even if there is an “outbreak.”

Read the full article here

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Putting norovirus into perspective.

Putting norovirus into perspective.

21 million: number of Americans who get the common stomach bug, or norovirus, on land
According to the CDC, U.S. residents on land have a 1 in 15 chance of contracting norovirus each year. The risk is far lower for cruise passengers departing from the United States: estimated at 1 in 12,000.

DOWNLOADABLE RESOURCES

Your cruise ship health resources.

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